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Traditional Thai Massage Certification

Approved for 8 Online Continuing Education Units/Credits (CEU's) for Pennsylvania Licensed Massage Therapists

Receive Your 8 CEU's Now

Approved for 8 Online CEU's for Pennsylvania Licensed Massage Therapists. Cost $100.00 / Certificates Awarded Upon Completion.



Please allow time for your purchase to process. We will contact you via email with instructions to access the online course as soon as your payment is complete. Please make sure your email address is correct. Thank you for your patience. 

Introduction
History
Summary

Traditional Thai massage, also known as Nuad Bo’Rarn, is the physical medicine component of a complete indigenous system of traditional medicine, traditional Thai medicine. The other components of traditional Thai medicine are herbal medicine, nutritional medicine, food cures, and spiritual practices, including meditation, yoga, incantations, and recitation of Buddhist sutras. Understanding the name Nuad Bo’Rarn can give us an insight into the nature of this form of healing body therapy. The word Nuad is from the Thai language and means “to touch with the intention of imparting healing.” The word Bo’Rarn is from the Sanskrit language of ancient India. It means “something that is ancient and revered.” So to the Thai people this work is held in the highest esteem and is understood to have specific healing attributes. The application of this work as a traditional medical modality is wide ranging. This includes the treatment of a wide range of medical problems such as myofascial, neurologic, orthopedic, internal medical, urogenital, gynecologic, and respiratory conditions as well as care during gestation and postpartum. In addition, Thai massage is used to treat psychologic problems. These techniques are used in settings from pediatrics through gerontology and currently are being applied in situations of palliative care.1

Historically, Thai massage was not specifically what we in the West consider massage. It was considered and used as the hands-on practice of traditional medicine. Thai massage techniques were applied in the treatment of the varied ailments that afflict humanity, including mental and emotional illness. The historical founder of Thai medicine is known as Jivaka Kumar Bhaccha (the Father Doctor). He is identified by scholars as a close personal associate of the historical Buddha and was the head physician of the original Sangha, the community of followers that gathered around the Buddha. This would place him as living in India approximately 2500 years ago. As Buddhist monks and followers made their way from India to what is now modern Thailand in approximately the second century bc, their traditional medicine came along with them. For centuries, the traditional medical knowledge was transmitted orally from teacher to student. Over the centuries, a distinct tradition evolved that was influenced primarily by the Ayurvedic traditions in India but also began to incorporate theories and practices from ancient China. Healing practices of the indigenous tribal peoples of the area also became part of the local medical practices. By the time Theravada Buddhism was declared the official religion of the kingdom in approximately 1292 AD, the traditional medicine was well established in the Buddhist monasteries, known as Wats. Traditionally, the Buddhist monks and to a lesser 388extent Buddhist nuns administered the healing work to the people.

Not only did Buddhist monasteries pass on the specific hands-on techniques, herbs, and foods used in healing, but Buddhist philosophy pervades the practice of medicine in Thailand. The practice of healing work is understood to be the practical application of Metta, loving kindness. Metta is understood to be a core component of daily life for each individual seeking awareness and fulfillment on the path taught by the Buddha. Teachers describe Metta as the “foundation of the world,” essential for the peace and happiness of oneself and others.

In Thai Theravada Buddhism, significant emphasis is placed on the practical application of spiritual philosophy: that is, the concept that higher ideals should be brought into everyday life and decisions. Accordingly, the practice of Thai massage demonstrates the practical application of the Four Divine States of Mind:

1. Metta, loving kindness

2. Compassion

3. Vicarious joy

4. Mental equanimity (brought to fruition by meditative practice)1

In this chapter, the reader has been introduced to the hands-on healing tradition of Thailand (ancient Siam). Known in Thailand as Nuad Bo’Rarn and in the West as Thai massage, this ancient system of healing bodywork dates back approximately 2500 years.

In the Thai culture, this healing work is used to treat the varied maladies that afflict humanity, including internal medical problems, psychoemotional issues, and musculoskeletal complaints. The techniques and application of Thai massage differ in many ways from that of Western massage therapy. Although Thai massage has only recently become known in the West, the acceptance of this style of work has grown rapidly. Currently, Thai massage courses are being taught at many schools and retreat centers in the Western world, and there is a great demand for practitioners at spas and clinics worldwide. Learning, practicing, and receiving Thai massage can be a wonderful and life-enriching experience.

See this technique in practice

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Receive Your 8 CEU's Now

Approved for 8 Online CEU's for Pennsylvania Licensed Massage Therapists. Cost $100.00 / Certificates Awarded Upon Completion.



Please allow time for your purchase to process. We will contact you via email with instructions to access the online course as soon as your payment is complete. Please make sure your email address is correct. Thank you for your patience.